I once worked with a police officer who started his career in 1960 as a township constable. Ten years later, the village and township merged and he became an officer in the new police department. One day I asked him what type of calls he handled as a constable. He told me that most of the calls had to do with neighbors that don't get along. He said that frequently, these were disputes over property lines. These days, we don't receive many calls concerning property line disputes, but in other ways, not much has changed as we are called when people don't get along. 

On June 6, Officer Justin Edmundson responded to a call from a woman who said she was outside weeding her flower garden. The two men living next door were outside as well. They began making comments and laughing at her. One man threw his beer can into her flower garden. When Justin asked the man why he did this, he told him that he thought it was funny. Justin suggested he retrieve his beer can and had a conversation with him about neighborly etiquette and how beer cans probably don't play a part. Officer Jeff Roerick was called to a manufactured home park on the afternoon of June 8. Two men who lived across the street from each other did not get along. This had been the case for quite some time. When Jeff arrived, one man was filming the other with his cell phone. The other accused that man of sending threatening text messages to his cell phone. Each accused the other of harassment. Yet again, they were both told that they should go to court to seek harassment restraining orders as nothing criminal had taken place. Officers were back there again that night. It is going to be a long summer with these two. 

Later that day, a woman reported to Sergeant Jeff Carlson that she had agreed to clean someone's house and now the person refused to pay her. Jeff asked the woman the name of the person refusing to provide payment and she said, "I don't know her name."

Officers were called to a manufactured home community on the afternoon of June 9. One neighbor accused the other of stealing her garden watering can. The officer spoke with both parties. One admitted to having the watering can and said the reason for this is that the other's children had been throwing it against the side of her house. 

The following day, an officer was called back. This time, the one that was missing the sprinkling can was accusing the children next door of throwing eggs at the side of her house. The officer went next door again. The woman's young children said their mother couldn't come to the door. He asked them about the eggs and they told them they had thrown them at the side of the trailer because their mother had told them to do so. When the children's mother finally came to the door to speak with the officer, she accused him of "breaking the law" by speaking with her children. When the officer suggested she clean the eggs off her neighbor's house, she told him that maybe she would do so tomorrow as she was too busy today. 

Sometimes police calls take an interesting twist. For example, on June 14 at 1:30 a.m., Officer Ashley Moran received a call of a naked man walking down an alley. When she arrived, she spoke with one resident who told her that he heard a suspicious noise outside and thought he would check it out. He said he figured all his neighbors would be in bed, so he decided he would briefly investigate without putting on clothes. He walked outside just a car turned the corner into the alley. I guess this gives a whole new meaning to the term, "deer in the headlights."

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